Tag Archives: data

Pollution wants to be free

You know that free stuff? Yea? Right: It’s garbage. Data don’t want to be free — they are freely available. When the sun first shone on the Earth, nobody had to pay for that. Data streams exist (whether you like … Continue reading
Continue reading

Posted in nonanon.net | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Pollution wants to be free

Textual Materialism

One of the things studied as an exchange student was “literature science” — i.e. the science of creating literature. We talked about authors who created texts, and then the author as individuals, separated from the text, the author of the … Continue reading
Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Textual Materialism

History will teach us something completely different

The next time you see a news story with a neat-o graph showing lots of numbers and statistics in lines, bar graphs, pie charts and what not — try to ask yourself some questions like these: When was the last … Continue reading
Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on History will teach us something completely different

Blogs vs. Magazines (?)

Those who are familiar with my research in the field of information science will know that a big part of it involved terms for document types (also known as “Form” and “Genre” in the field of archives management). These terms … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Blogs vs. Magazines (?)

When you were really looking into the people who are really good at distinguishing signal from noise, did you notice a pattern among the people who can do it and the people who seem terrible at it?

Nate Silver: There are characteristics. One of them is they tend to be multi-disciplinary. So instead of having one big theory, kind of capital T, that explains everything, then they throw a lot of different methods at a problem. They … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on When you were really looking into the people who are really good at distinguishing signal from noise, did you notice a pattern among the people who can do it and the people who seem terrible at it?

Let’s go to the video tape! :)

Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Let’s go to the video tape! :)

More and more, people are taking up the challenge of connecting the dots; In doing so, they find they can address problems in more sensible ways — and achieve results

My friend Mark Junkunc shared an interesting article today; “Social Change’s Age of Enlightenment“. There are some issues I have with some of the finer points — for example, I think the proposition that data are “measurable” is somewhat overstated … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on More and more, people are taking up the challenge of connecting the dots; In doing so, they find they can address problems in more sensible ways — and achieve results

Grand Central Station

For an American who grew up in the NYC metropolitan area, Grand Central Station is the epitome of location. For native New Yorkers (i.e. the city dwellers), there are probably others — perhaps Times Square, Central Park, whatever (for the … Continue reading Continue reading

Posted in remediary.com | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Grand Central Station

Grin and bear it

If something is wrong or if a problem exists, why is it considered socially acceptable — or even heroic — behavior to pretend the problem doesn’t exist? Social-Problems News Post Forum Continue reading

Posted in social-problems.info | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Grin and bear it